Three Boys Found Man About To Jump Off Bridge, Grabbed Him And Didn’t Let Go

The mentality of ‘not wanting to get involved’ often prevents people from making a huge difference when they see something unjust or tragic about to happen.

Fortunately, children are much purer in their hearts than adults, and ‘not wanting to get involved’ was far from the thoughts of three heroes no older than 14, when on Sept. 21, 2017, they saved a suicidal man from jumping to his death.

Devonte Cafferkey, 13, Sammy Farah, 14, and Shawn Young, 12, were coming home from St Mary’s High School in Cheshunt, Hertfordshire, when they noticed a man sitting at the edge of an overpass in Waltham Cross, with a rope strung around his neck.

Yet, they didn’t panic, and simply approached the man and tried to coax him from the edge.

They attempted to dissuade him, but he turned and prepared to jump. At this point, they grabbed onto him and refused to let go.

Shawn calmly called for help, and two passers-by came to help rescue the man, James Higlett, and 47-year-old Joanne Stammers.

Stammers said that when she approached the man, he was crying.

Appearing on ITV’s This Morning show last year, Devonte told interviewers that they ran and got help and saw a rope around his neck. They were persuading him not to jump, while he was crying and wiping his eyes. The boys said, ‘You’ve got family, it’s not worth it.’”

Carol, Shawn’s mother later explained that the boys told her that as they were holding on to the man, he began passing out, making it harder for them to manage his weight and hold him back.

Fortunately, the boys held onto the man long enough for the road around the Waltham Cross to close as a precaution, and the man was taken to hospital at around 6:20 pm.

Carol was fascinated by the maturity of the boys. When Shawn told her what happened when he came home, she left him to finish, and she was smiling all the time, as there was nothing she could add to it.

While trying to keep the man back and talk him out of suicide, Shawn passed the boys his mobile phone saying ‘if it rings, don’t answer it’.”

Jacqueline Cafferkey, Devonte’s mother, said the incident was traumatic for him, and he did not want to go to school that Monday, which “never happens” according to his mom. She adds that she is filled with pride, and she keeps telling him that he has saved someone’s life, which is a huge thing.

Mohamed Farah, Sammy’s dad, described his son as a ‘quiet and humble boy’, that likes to help people. He adds that the act of the boys was bravery.

Joanne Stammers is disabled with Klippel–Trénaunay syndrome, a rare condition that makes her highly prone to blood clotting. Yet, this did not stop her from helping the man, and at the end, she was left with bruises all over her arms.

All five heroes will receive awards from the Royal Humane Society, a charity that promotes life-saving interventions.

Carol added that she is extremely proud of all three of the boys and that it is great that they are getting recognized for doing something good in the community.

The heroes received the Special Achievement Awards at the Broxbourne Youth Awards for their bravery.

Joanne said the award was a “great honor” and she keeps in touch with Jacqueline Cafferkey, Devonte’s mother. She added that she is pleased for the boys, and she hopes other children will learn that it’s worth stopping to help someone.

Joanne was on her way back from seeing her mother in Waltham Cross when Shawn asked her help. She keeps going under the bridge once a week, but she avoids the route now, whenever possible.

Suicide is a major national public health issue in the United States. On average, adjusted for age, the annual U.S. suicide rate increased by 24% between 1999 and 2014, from 10.5 to 13.0 suicides per 100,000 people, the highest rate recorded in 28 years.

Additionally, suicide is generally underreported, as a result of the stigma surrounding it.

Unfortunately, rates have continued to increase.

Pinpointing the reasons for suicide rates rise is challenging partly since the causes of suicide are complex. Risk factors include health factors (like depression, substance use problems, serious mental illness and serious physical health conditions including pain), environmental factors (like access to lethal means and stressful life events such as divorce, unemployment, relationship problems or financial crisis) and historical factors (previous suicide attempts, a family history of suicide and a history of childhood abuse or trauma).

Christine Moutier, MD, chief medical officer of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, claims that at the individual level, there is never a single cause of suicide. There are always multiple risk factors.

Experts claim that a key message is that there is genuine hope for people considering suicide.

Joel Dvoskin, Ph.D., ABPP, a clinical and forensic psychologist in Arizona and New Mexico maintains that suicide is about despair, and the only cure for despair is hope.

By helping people to regain hope, we could talk them out of it and persuade them to see the beauty of life once again.

Photo of a state trooper praying with man who lost his brother is going viral

MADISONVILLE, Texas (12/19/2019) — It’s a photo that is touching hearts, and is reminding us of the reason for the season.

Lanell McGee James posted on her Facebook page a photo of a state trooper praying with her brother. Her post begins, ” With so much going on nowadays with police killing people and people killing the police as well as racial tensions, I felt compelled to share this picture.”

James says she and her husband were driving to Dallas when they were pulled over. The trooper, identified only as Trooper Bates, asked where they were headed, she said Dallas due to a death in the family.

What happened next is what appears to have prompted James to share the photo with the world.

Here is part of what she posted:

He asked was it immediate and I said yes my husbands brother. He said oh I’m sorry to hear that, do you know where he is? My husband answered “yes at the morgue” and the office responded “no he is now in his heavenly home”. At this point my husband and I are both moved to tears because his brothers death was very unexpected. The officer asked for my ID and returned to his vehicle. He came back with a warning and asked if he could pray with us. He removed his hat asked to hold our hands and he prayed with us. I have NEVER had this happen before but it was everything that we needed in that moment. Thank you so much Trooper Bates for praying with us!

The night the Titanic sank in 1912

The night the Titanic sank in 1912 on April 14th, 1,528 people went into the frigid waters. John Harper, after putting his only daughter on a lifeboat, was seen swimming frantically to people in the water leading them to Jesus before the hypothermia became fatal. Rev. Harper swam up to one young man who had climbed up on a piece of debris. Rev. Harper asked him between breaths, “Are you saved?” The young man replied that he was not.

Harper then tried to lead him to Christ only to have the young man who was near shock, reply no. John Harper then took off his life jacket and threw it to the man and said “Here then, you need this more than I do…” and swam away to other people. A few minutes later Harper swam back to the young man and succeeded in leading him to salvation. Of the 1,528 people that went into the water that night, six were rescued by the lifeboats. One of them was this young man on the debris. Four years later, at a survivors meeting, this young man stood up and in tears recounted how John Harper had led him to Christ. Rev. Harper had tried to swim back to help other people, yet because of the intense cold, had grown too weak to swim. His last words before going under in the frigid waters were “Believe on the name of the Lord Jesus and you will be saved.” Does Hollywood remember this man? No. Oh well, no matter. This servant of God did what he had to do. While other people were trying to buy their way onto the lifeboats and were selfishly trying to save their own lives, John Harper gave up his life so that others could be saved.

John Harper knew what it meant to live life with urgency.